Trespass to try title claims failed to waive immunity, but court remanded to allow further pleading attempts

City of San Antonio v. Albert Davila, Individually; Madeline Davila, Individually; and Albert Davila as Trustee of the Albert Pena Davila and Madeline Davila Living Trust, 04-20-00478-CV, (Tex. App – San Antonio, August 4, 2021)

This is a trespass to try title case where the Fourth Court of Appeals reversed the denial of the City’s plea to the jurisdiction but remanded to allow Plaintiff the ability to replead.

The Davilas sued the City in a trespass to try title action. The Davilas alleged that, as part of closing and abandoning 12th Street and conveying parcels to adjoining landowners in 1987, the City deeded the subject property to the Davilas’ parents. Alternatively, they allege they adversely possessed the property. The City filed a plea to the jurisdiction asserting the City issued a quick claim deed to Davila’s parents and the deed recites the City passed an ordinance authorizing the sale of the property to the Davilas’ parents. The quitclaim deed also contains a metes-and-bounds description of the subject property and reserves a utility easement. The trial court denied the plea and the City appealed.

When a city is sued in a trespass to try title action based on adverse possession, governmental immunity is not waived, and the trial court lacks subject matter jurisdiction. As a result, the claims, as alleged, do not waive immunity. The Davilas argue section 16.005 of the Texas Civil Practice & Remedies Code waives the City’s governmental immunity, which relates to road closure ordinances. The Davilas did not request relief from the City’s ordinance under Chapter 16, which authorized the sale or abandonment of property, but from the quitclaim deed itself. It does not waive immunity. However, the plea attacks the pleadings only. The City’s brief does not argue or explain why the pleading defect—suing the City instead of government officials for ultra vires acts—is incurable. As a result, the Davilas must be given the opportunity to amend their pleadings.

Panel consists of Chief Justice Martinez, and Justices Chapa and Valenzuela. Reversed and remanded. Memorandum Opinion by Justice Chapa can be read here. Docket page with attorney information found here.