Tyler Court of Appeals holds Tort Claims Act notice must list specific claimants in order to waive immunity

Leondra Leach v. The City Of Tyler, 12-21-00004-CV (Tex. App. – Tyler June 9, 2021).

This is a Texas Tort Claims Act (“TTCA”) premise defect case where the Tyler Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s order dismissing the case for lack of proper notice.

Leach asserts he was injured when a piece of board flew from a City “roll-off” truck as it passed Leach on the roadway. The board struck the truck he was driving and entered the driver’s side window, striking him in the head. Leach’s employer submitted a notice of claim using a Claims Notice form provided by the City, but did not fill in certain fields as to Leach. Leach did not fill out his own form. After Leach filed suit, the City filed a no-evidence motion for summary judgment as to proper notice under the City’s charter and ordinance, which the trial court granted.  Leach appealed.

Ameri-Tex (Leach’s employer) listed itself alone as the “claimant” and omitted Leach’s name from that field. Section 101.101(a) speaks to the governmental unit’s entitlement to receive a notice of a claim along with the damage or injury claimed. Ameri-Tex listed only its property damages under the provision for the amount of claim. The court noted that had Ameri-Tex made some reference to Leach’s damages in the “amount of claim” section, even if such damages were described as “unknown at this time,” its earlier omission of Leach as a “claimant” would be less critical. However, part of the purpose behind the notice provision is that the entity has an awareness of its fault as ultimately alleged and an incentive to investigate the allegations to assess its exposure to liability because it no longer is protected by the shield of immunity.  Without knowledge of the identity of a potential claimant and the knowledge this additional claimant will make personal injury claims as opposed to merely property damage claims, the entity does not have the same incentive. Notice which does not convey the “perceived peril” that would serve the notice requirement’s purpose is insufficient.

If you would like to read this opinion click here. Panel consists of Chief Justice Worthen, and Justices Hoyle and Neeley.  Memorandum opinion by Justice Neeley.